#IndieWednesedays: Overture, or what would happen if Diablo III and Zelda had an 8-bit child

A quirky mix of Zelda, Diablo and Robotron, with classy pixel art graphics and huge, randomly generated levels. It's more than meets the eye.

Black Shell Media's Overture is a roguelike title that at first glance seems simple, but surprises with its depth and variety - if you give it a chance.


#Overture is one of those intense #indiegames that seem 'small', yet somehow provide hours and hours of fun

The premise is simple: you create your character, choose one of 24 (!) classes, and go on action-adventuring (mostly fighting) on countless randomly generated levels, full of PO'ed enemies, sweet loot, and bosses.

Oh, boy. The bosses.

Overture takes a cue from classic action games and makes its bosses large (and we mean LARGE), dangerous (DANGEROUS!) and satisfying to beat. It's not an easy task, but if you accomplish it, you're going to remember the encounter. And that's, in our opinion, how boss fights should feel like: like epic encounters that leave you with your hands shaking.



#Overture's soundtrack would be a classic in the 8-bit era. #IndieWednesday today, tomorrow#ChiptuneThursday

Also, let's not forget about the music. We'd say the graphics are somewhat similar in style to 8-bit games, but the soundtrack isn't just similar. It's 100% authentic. The nostalgia-activating chiptune sound is responsible for half of the game's atmosphere, and we'd love to have it available as a separate download.

All in all, Overture is a modern game in old game's clothing. It's an incredibly fast-paced hack'n'slash offering a plethora of game styles, depending on the character class you choose. Its cutesy sprites may look like taken straight from the oldest Zelda or Final Fantasy games, but in general its closer in spirit to Diablo III, with a sprinke of Robotron (or Crimsonland, if you're not that old). We can't recommend it enough.

Before you buy Overture at Kinguin.net, learn what Black Shell Media had to say about the development of their game.

 

 

#Overture mixes „retro nostalgia, sensory overload, extreme challenge, and a sense of discovery”. #IndieWednesdays

Kinguin: Did you think of a gameplay first and the fantasy setting later, or did you want to make a fantasy game, and then chose the genre?

Black Shell Media: Originally the game was supposed to be a prequel to SanctuaryRPG, but the story aspect was cut somewhere along in production. We originally set out to create a roguelike game in a fantasy setting!

 


K: How did you balance your game? Have you, let's say, made up all the rules before programming the whole thing, or was it a long process of testing and correcting, testing and correcting...?

BSM: Game development is always a long process of testing and correcting, and anyone who says otherwise is lying. Slight exaggeration, but the iterative process is key to designing a good game. Designing a game to be perfectly balanced on paper is almost an impossibility.


K: Is there, in your opinion, a formula for a good, addicting game? And did you try to include it in Overture?

BSM: Fun. There really isn't a formula for fun, but we tried to approximate it as much as possible. Part of Overture's charm is retro nostalgia, sensory overload, extreme challenge, and a sense of discovery.

 


K: How do you see the gaming industry nowadays? In which direction should modern games go?

BSM: The game industry should seek to innovate as much as possible. This doesn't necessarily have to be in terms of technology, but games should always seek to do at least a few things differently.


K: Overture has been received fondly by gamers, so... what's next? Do you want to make a bigger, more complex and graphically advanced title?

BSM: We're working on a few titles at the moment with varying degrees of scope and engineering complexity. We're always looking to create unique and fun experiences that players will enjoy and remember, and we aren't stopping any time soon!


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Buy Overture PC key on Kinguin.net and see how is it possible that a game so small can be so addictive.